Tag Archives: Taxes

Do You Want To Know About Your IRS Account Balance? IRS Launches New Online Tool to Assist Taxpayers with Basic Tax Account Information

irs-online-toolThe Internal Revenue Service announced on December 1, 2016 (IR-2016-155) the launch of an online application that will assist taxpayers with straightforward balance inquiries in a safe, easy and convenient way.

This new and secure tool, available on IRS.gov allows taxpayers to view their IRS account balance, which will include the amount they owe for tax, penalties and interest.

It also should be pointed out that taxpayers may also continue to take advantage of the Continue reading

Tax Update: Governor Christie Reverses and Repeals New Law and Reinstates Pennsylvania-New Jersey Reciprocal Tax Agreement Preventing Adversely Impacting 250,000 Workers & Thousands of Employers

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IMPORTANT TAX ALERT:

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie on Tuesday, November 22, 2016, reinstated a four-decade old tax reciprocity agreement with Pennsylvania that allows residents who work in either state to pay income taxes at their home state’s rate. You can almost hear the collective sigh of relief of the many commuters that would have been adversely impacted by this new law. Continue reading

Did You Get a Letter in the Mail from the IRS? Here is What You Need to Do

IRS NOTICE OF PROPOSED CHANGEEach year, the IRS mails millions of notices and letters to taxpayers for a variety of reasons. This can be extremely upsetting when receiving this form of communication, whether it is from the IRS or any other taxing authority.  The following tips are presented to reduce your anxiety and to provide a specific action plan for any correspondence received from the IRS (or from your state or local taxing authority):

  • Don’t Panic: You can usually deal with a notice simply by responding to it. You should immediately contact your tax attorney, CPA or tax adviser to discuss this matter in more detail.
    • Tip: Waiting can only compound and complicate your tax problems.
  • Most IRS notices are about federal tax returns or tax accounts: Each notice has specific instructions, so read your notice carefully because it will tell you what you need to do.  Follow the instructions very carefully.  The goal here is to give a specific and detailed response to the tax issue in question.
    • Tip: Only respond to the particular issue and do not provide or discuss issues that are not being raised by the IRS.
  • Taxes You Owe or Payment Request:  Your notice will likely be about changes to your account, taxes you owe or a payment request. However, your notice may ask you for more information about a specific issue.
    • Tip: Do not assume that the taxes owed are correct. In many cases, the IRS calculates taxes without all the relevant facts.

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2016 Standard Mileage Rates for Business, Medical and Moving

2015 IRS Mileage RatesThe Internal Revenue Service on December 18, 2015 issued the 2016 optional standard mileage rates used to calculate the deductible costs of operating an automobile for business, charitable, medical or moving purposes.

Beginning on Jan. 1, 2016, the standard mileage rates for the use of a car (also vans, pickups or panel trucks) will be:

• 54 cents per mile for business miles driven, down from 57.5 cents for 2015

• 19 cents per mile driven for medical or moving purposes, down from 23 cents for 2015 Continue reading

Tax Positions of Presidential Candidates

Here is a neat info-graphic on the tax positions of the Presidential Candidates. Special thanks to MBACentral.org

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New 2015 Tax Law Changes Tax and FBAR Filing Deadlines & Other Noteworthy Compliance Provisions: The Good, The Bad & The Ugly

2015 Tax Law Changes

On Friday, July 31, 2015, President Barack Obama signed HR 3236, the “Surface Transportation and Veterans Health Care Choice Improvement Act of 2015” (the “Act”). Not sure how this name relates to taxes but in any event the following tax law changes and provisions became law under this Act:

  • Changes to the due dates for various returns. The Act sets new due dates for partnership returns, C corporation returns.
  • Foreign Bank Account Reporting:  New due dates for the important and often overlooked foreign bank account reporting (FBAR) forms, known as FinCEN Form 114, Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts have been implemented.
  • Changing the six year statute of limitations to apply to understatements of income that resulted from taxpayers overstating tax basis when calculating sales.  This change overturns the Home Concrete case where the Supreme Court ruled that understatements of income as a result of basis miscalculations would not trigger the extended six-year statute of limitations applicable to understatements of income.
  • Requiring consistent basis reporting for estates and estate beneficiaries.
  • Requiring additional information to be included in mortgage information statements.
  • Other Information Returns:  The new act imposes new filing requirements for several other IRS information returns.

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Philadelphia Businesses Must Now Provide A New Tax Notice To Employees and Non-Payroll Workers

Philadelphia Business Employer Notice Requirements 2015 Philadelphia notice Requirements for Businesses for 2015

If you are a business that has employees or independent contractors who live in Philadelphia, the City of Philadelphia is now imposing new notice requirements.

Beginning January 1, 2015, Title 19, Chapter 19-4000, of the Philadelphia Code, entitled “Income Inequality Initiative – Earned Income Tax Credit,” requires all employers to provide notice of the federal Earned Income Tax Credit (“EITC”) program to all Philadelphia resident employees and non-payroll workers at the same time as their W-2, 1099, or comparable forms are provided.

This new law applies to not only companies in Philadelphia but to those entities not located in Philadelphia that employ or pay residents of the City of Philadelphia.

About the Earned Income Tax Credit:

The Earned Income Tax Credit (“EITC”) is a refundable credit available to low to moderate income individuals and families. Over 40,000 Philadelphia residents are not claiming EITC, which has an average benefit of $2,400 per return. The goal of this law change is to help help more of its citizens take advantage of this tax break and ultimately infusing an extra $100 million into the Philadelphia economy.

The City of Philadelphia Earned Income Tax Credit Notice Requirements:

Under Title 19, Chapter 19-4000 of the Philadelphia Code, an employer must do the following:

(A) The employer must give the employee or non-payroll worker the “2014 Earned Income Tax Credit (‘EITC’) Notice,” at the same time it provides a W-2, 1099, or comparable form

OR

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